Tips & Info

Improve Your Produce IQ: Sunchokes

From Sound Dietitians, a partner of the Verdant Health Commission. View the complete blog post and recipes from Sound Dietitians at www.sounddietitians.com/sd-blog/sunchokes.

 

Throughout the years, my family and I have been trying to enjoy as wide of a variety of vegetables as available in the Pacific Northwest. We experiment with new ones whenever we get the chance. One vegetable we have never had until now is the sunchoke, or Jerusalem artichoke, which is a perennial root vegetable (aka: “tuber”). This means they grow in the ground like potatoes and sweet potatoes, though they are small, like ginger knobs. Like other tubers, they have a thin skin that doesn’t need peeling; just give the vegetable a good scrub before using.  These tubers are also harvested in the fall.

​Even though they are also called Jerusalem artichokes, they are not related to actual artichokes. Globe artichokes are a thistle and have an edible flower.

What does a sunchoke taste like?

Choose sunchokes that are very firm and smooth. Some say they taste like artichoke hearts. Others say they are rather sweet and nutty. They have a texture like a potato and are creamy when cooked. ​

How do you eat sunchokes?

Keep in mind, the flesh of the sunchoke turns brown, like apples or pears, when exposed to air. Mix with chopped raw vegetables and a tiny bit of lemon juice, should you plan on them sitting out for awhile. Like kohlrabi and jicama, you can eat this vegetable either raw or cooked.

Ideas for using these include:

  1. Thinly slice them like a chip and dip into hummus or another sauce.
  2. Shave them into a mixed salad.
  3. Roast them with garlic, butter and salt and mash them.
  4. Mix them with other root vegetables for a roasted veggie dish.
  5. Substitute them in your favorite potato/sweet potato recipes.

 

View the rest of the blog post from Nancy Miller, a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist with Sound Dietitians, for nutrition information and a recipe for Lentil Stew with Steamed Rock Fish and Sunchokes on the Sound Dietitians blog: www.sounddietitians.com/sd-blog/sunchokes